Putting two new HD television antennas to the test

Disclosure: Antennas Direct has provided me with two television antennas for this review. I have been compensated for this post. This post contains affiliate links. Read full Disclosure Policy.

clearstream4v

Earlier this year, I dedicated several of my columns to the topic of over-the-air television reception — a great way to save money if you’re willing to cut the cord. These columns were popular with my syndicated readership, generating a lot of responses from people interested in installing an HDTV television antenna.

Around the same time, I also received an email from Antennas Direct asking if I’d like to review their television antennas specifically designed to receive HDTV signals. Over the course of our conversations discussing our current setup at home, Antennas Direct offered to send me two antennas to review:

My intention was to replace our existing element roof antenna with the Clearstream 4V and take the Eclipse indoor antenna to my daughter’s college apartment so she could enjoy free television reception at school, reviewing the antennas’ performance at both locations.

elementantenna

Antenna testing at our house

A little more about our antenna setup at home:  While our existing, element-style roof-mounted antenna is old (20+ years now) and has multiple broken elements from tree branches falling into it over the years, it’s still getting the job done. We have a Pico signal amp that cost more than our antenna did (it’s this one, if you’re curious) and with it, we can pull in more than 60 over-the-air television channels on a clear day.

As a benchmark for my antenna testing, I made a list of the 61 channels I was receiving on testing day with my current, element-style antenna mounted on the roof of a single-story home about 50 miles from Chicago:

2-1 WBBM (CBS, Chicago, IL)
2-2 Decades (Classic television and documentaries, Chicago, IL)
5-1 WMAQ (NBC, Chicago, IL)
5-2 Cozi (Classic television, Chicago, IL )
7-1 WLS (ABC, Chicago, IL)
7-2 Live Well (Lifestyle television, Chicago, IL)
7-3 LAFF (Comedy television and movies, Chicago, IL)
9-1 WGN (CW, Chicago, IL)
9-2 Antenna TV (Classic television, Chicago, IL)
9-3 THIS TV (Retro movies and television, Chicago, IL)
11-1 WTTW (PBS, Chicago, IL)
11-2 Prime (PBS, Chicago, IL)
11-3 Create (Chicago, IL)
11-4 V-Me (Spanish programming, Chicago, IL)
13-1 WREX (NBC, Rockford, IL)
13-2 Stateline (CW, Rockford, IL)
13-3 Me TV (Classic television, Rockford, IL)
17-1 WTVO (ABC, Rockford, IL)
17-2 My Network (Rockford, IL)
20-1 WYCC (PBS, Chicago, IL)
20-2 FNX First Nations Experience (World programming, Chicago, IL)
20-3 MHZ (World programming, Chicago, IL)
22-6 Rev’N (Auto enthusiast and motorsports programming, Chicago, IL)
22-7 Retro (Classic television, Chicago, IL)
24-3 TUFF TV (Motorsports, outdoors, and adventure programming, Chicago, IL)
26-1 WCIU (The U, Chicago, IL)
26-2 UToo (Chicago, IL)
26-3 Me TV (Chicago, IL)
26-4 Heroes & Icons (Classic television, Chicago, IL)
26-5 Bounce (African-American movies and television, Chicago, IL)
32-1 WFLD (Fox, Chicago, IL)
32-4 WMEU (UToo Chicago, IL)
38-1 Ion (Classic and original television, Chicago, IL)
38-2 Qubo (Children’s television, Chicago, IL)
38-3 Ion Life (Lifestyle television, Chicago, IL)
38-4 SHOP (Home shopping, Chicago, IL)
38-5 QVC (Home shopping, Chicago, IL)
38-6 HSN Home shopping Network (Chicago, IL)
39-1 WQRF (Fox, Rockford, IL)
41.1 The Works (Classic and action television, Chicago, IL)
41-2 Comet (Sci-fi television, Chicago, IL)
44-1 WSNS (Telemundo, Chicago, IL)
44-2 TeleXitos (Spanish action and adventure, Chicago, IL)
48-2 WCIU (The U, Chicago, IL)
50-1 WPWR (My 50 Chicago, IL)
50-2 Movies! (Movie channel, Chicago, IL)
50-3 Mundo (Spanish programming, Chicago, IL)
50-4 Buzzr (Classic game shows, Chicago, IL)
52-2 TCC (Chicago, IL)
52-3 Combo (Chicago, IL)
52-4 Enlace (Spanish programming, Chicago, IL)
60-1 WXFT (Univision, Aurora, IL)
60-2 WGBO (Univision Noticias, Aurora, IL)
60-3 Escape (Crime and mystery television, Aurora, IL)
61-2 WYJS (Religious programming, Chicago, IL)
62-2 MCTV My Christian TV (Chicago, IL)
62-3 Prism (Religious programming, Chicago, IL)
62-4 Prism2 (Religious programming, Chicago, IL)
66-1 WGBO (Univision, Joliet, IL)
66-2 Get TV (Classic movies and television, Joliet, IL)
66-3 Grit TV (Classic television, Joliet, IL)

 

clearstream

Antenna assembly

Assembling the Antennas Direct Clearstream 4V Indoor/Outdoor HDTV antenna was pretty easy — the antenna comes with an excellent instruction sheet that has both text explanations and graphics to show how everything goes together. It comes with a bracket and short mast to attach it to the roof. You can also use its built-in clamps to attach it to an existing antenna mast, which is what I chose to do as I already have a rooftop mast installed.

After mounting the antenna, I connected the Clearstream 4V with the same coax that leads from our roof to the signal amp that my previous antenna was using. Once it was installed, I rescanned for channels with the Clearstream 4V antenna. I was able to receive 11 channels.

11channels

I adjusted the position of the antenna on the mast and rescanned a few times, but I was able to receive the most channels with it pointed in the same direction as my existing element antenna — 11. Using my old antenna’s channel list as a reception benchmark, I recorded which channels I was able to receive with the Clearstream 4V. Channels shown in red were not detected by the Clearstream 4V antenna; green channels were detected:

2-1 WBBM
2-2 Decades
5-1 WMAQ
5-2 Cozi

7-1 WLS
7-2 Live Well
7-3 LAFF
9-1 WGN
9-2 Antenna TV
9-3 THIS TV
11-1 WTTW
11-2 Prime
11-3 Create
11-4 V-Me

13-1 WREX
13-2 Stateline
13-3 Me TV
17-1 WTVO
17-2 My Network
20-1 WYCC
20-2 FNX First Nations Experience
20-3 MHZ
22-6 Rev’N
22-7 Retro
24-3 TUFF TV
26-1 WCIU
26-2 UToo
26-3 Me TV
26-4 Heroes & Icons
26-5 Bounce
32-1 WFLD
32-4 WMEU
38-1 Ion
38-2 Qubo
38-3 Ion Life
38-4 SHOP
38-5 QVC
38-6 HSN

39-1 WQRF
41.1 The Works
41.2 Comet
44-1 WSNS
44-2 TeleXitos
48-2 WCIU
50-1 WPWR
50-2 Movies!
50-3 Mundo
50-4 Buzzr
52-2 TCC
52-3 Combo
52-4 Enlace
60-1 WXFT
60-2 WGBO
60-3 Escape
61-2 WYJS
62-2 MCTV
62-3 Prism
62-4 Prism2
66.1 WGBO
66-2 Get TV
66-3 Grit TV

 

I was really surprised that the Clearstream 4V antenna did not pull in more channels. It has many excellent reviews online, but it just did not perform as well as our existing antenna installation. I’m not sure if it’s this antenna’s smaller size, the thick foliage of the mature trees on our property, or perhaps a combination of the two that limited what it was able to pick up. We lost all of the Rockford, Aurora and Joliet-based channels, as well as several major Chicago networks.

eclipse

Next, I tested the Clearstream Eclipse indoor HDTV antenna. This antenna comes with a small amplifier that plugs into the wall, and the antenna sticks to the window or the wall. It’s very easy to set up. The box contains a loop-shaped antenna, an adhesive strip to stick the antenna to a wall or window, two coax cables, a small signal amplifier, and a cord and plug for the amp.

eclipsebox

The antenna is white on one side and black on the other, so you can choose the color that best blends with your home decor. The adhesive Sure Grip™ strip can be positioned and re-positioned on any flat and smooth surface, so you don’t have to put any holes in the wall or risk damaging your paint.

eclipseloop

I connected the Eclipse antenna to a television, then scanned a few times to find the optimal location for this antenna, which again surprised me — it received more channels stuck to an east-facing wall of the house versus hanging in an east-facing window a few feet away. Even more surprising: It picked up more channels on the first floor of our house than the roof-mounted Clearstream 4V antenna did.

32channels

The Clearstream Eclipse antenna was able to pick up 32 channels. Again, I’m noting the differences between our old rooftop antenna and the window antenna. Here, I also used my old antenna’s channel list as a reception benchmark and recorded which channels I was able to receive with the Clearstream Eclipse. Channels shown in red were not detected by the Clearstream Eclipse antenna; green channels were detected:

 

2-1 WBBM
2-2 Decades

5-1 WMAQ
5-2 Cozi
7-1 WLS
7-2 Live Well
7-3 LAFF
9-1 WGN
9-2 Antenna TV
9-3 THIS TV
11-1 WTTW
11-2 Prime
11-3 Create
11-4 V-Me

13-1 WREX
13-2 Stateline
13-3 Me TV
17-1 WTVO
17-2 My Network
20-1 WYCC
20-2 FNX First Nations Experience
20-3 MHZ
22-6 Rev’N
22-7 Retro
24-3 TUFF TV

26-1 WCIU
26-2 UToo
26-3 Me TV
26-4 Heroes & Icons
26-5 Bounce
32-1 WFLD
32-4 WMEU
38-1 Ion
38-2 Qubo
38-3 Ion Life
38-4 SHOP
38-5 QVC
38-6 HSN

39-1 WQRF
41.1 The Works
41.2 Comet

44-1 WSNS
44-2 TeleXitos
48-2 WCIU
50-1 WPWR
50-2 Movies!
50-3 Mundo
50-4 Buzzr

52-2 TCC
52-3 Combo
52-4 Enlace
60-1 WXFT
60-2 WGBO
60-3 Escape
61-2 WYJS
62-2 MCTV
62-3 Prism
62-4 Prism2
66.1 WGBO
66-2 Get TV
66-3 Grit TV

 

I expected to lose all of the Rockford channels as our house was effectively blocking everything to the west of the antenna, but it did pretty well and was able to receive most of the major Chicago networks. It was also unable to pick up some of the lower-powered stations, which I expected.

The biggest surprise to me was that this little round antenna picked up more stations than the larger and more robust Clearstream 4V antenna did. I think this Eclipse antenna would be a good option for anyone who can’t install a rooftop antenna in Chicagoland. Considering its small size and ease of installation, I was pretty impressed by its performance.


eiusign

Antenna testing at our daughter’s apartment

As I mentioned earlier, the Clearstream Eclipse indoor antenna was always earmarked for my daughter’s college apartment at Eastern Illinois University, but I wanted to try it out at home before packing up for her college move. However, based on the lower channel reception of the Clearstream 4V antenna when mounted on our roof, I removed that antenna and packed both antennas to test out at her college apartment.

Eastern Illinois University is located in Charleston, Illinois. It’s about 56 miles from Champaign, 55 miles from Decatur, and 95 miles from Springfield, which are Charleston’s closest major broadcast areas. According to Antenna Direct’s website, Charleston residents can expect to receive 14 channels in the area:

2-1 – WTWO (NBC, Terre Haute, IN)
3-1 – WCIA (CBS, Champaign, IL)
3-2 – WCIX (Me TV, Springfield IL)
12-1 – WILL (PBS and University of Illinois campus television, Urbana, IL)
15-1 – WICD (ABC, Champaign, IL)
15-2 – Comet (Sci-Fi television, Champaign, IL)
15-3 – Grit TV (Classic television, Champaign, IL)
17-1 – WAND (NBC, Decatur, IL)
17-2 – Cozi (Classic television, Decatur, IL)
17-3 – Cozi 2 (simulcast, Decatur, IL)
23-1 – WBUI (CW, Decatur, IL)
51-1 – WEIU (PBS and EIU campus television, Charleston, IL)
51-2 – MHZ Worldview (PBS, Charleston, IL)
51-6 – Weather Mix & WEIU Radio – (EIU campus television, Charleston, IL)

Using this list as a benchmark of channels she might be able to receive, I connected the Clearstream Eclipse indoor antenna to see what channels would come in.

antennaamp

Strangely, the Eclipse was not showing much signal strength when we were scanning for channels. As her apartment is located less than three blocks from the WEIU broadcast tower, I thought that even if her long-distance reception wasn’t stellar, she should have no problem picking up her local campus television channels. Look how close the television station is to her building:

weiu

After unpacking our daughter’s furniture and gear and connecting her television, we connected the Clearstream Eclipse antenna to her television and scanned for channels.

nosignalcharles

Nothing. Not even one channel. This was the antenna that performed best at home in Chicagoland, but it couldn’t pick up a single channel in Charleston, even with the antenna facing the on-campus television station. 

I moved the antenna to several different locations in the apartment and scanned with two different televisions, but… nothing. It really baffled me that we weren’t even picking up WEIU. According to the antenna’s documentation, being too close to a broadcast tower can also be problematic, noting that “your signal may be too strong and may require the use of an attenuator.”

I was glad I’d packed the indoor/outdoor Clearstream 4V antenna, as it looked like we were going to need it. 

While the Eclipse antenna includes its own amplifier, the Clearstream 4V does not. Thinking that she would use the indoor Eclipse antenna at her apartment (which has a built-in amp) I did not invest in a signal amp for our daughter’s installation. I really hadn’t planned on an outdoor antenna installation at all, as bringing the larger antenna along was an afterthought.

With all of her closest major broadcast cities located more than 50 miles away, and the Eclipse indoor antenna not picking up a thing, putting the Clearstream 4V to the test in the same location certainly had the potential to be interesting!

woodantenna

The apartment building has a wood railing around the back, and I positioned the Clearstream 4V antenna outside, running the coax through a window. Then, I scanned for channels.

Success! After a few rounds of antenna re-positioning and scan passes to obtain the maximum number of channels, I mounted this antenna facing north with its included hardware. 

With the Clearstream 4V antenna mounted outdoors, here are the 15 channels our daughter’s able to get a few blocks from the EIU campus:

3-1 – WCIA (CBS, Champaign, IL)
3-2 – WCIX (Me TV, Springfield IL)
15-1 – WICD (ABC, Champaign, IL)
15-2 – Comet (Sci-Fi television, Champaign, IL)
15-3 – Grit TV (Classic television, Champaign, IL)

16-1 – WUSI (PBS, Carbondale, IL)
16-2 – WSIU World (PBS, Carbondale, IL)
16-3 – Create (PBS, Carbondale, IL)
16-4 – WSIU FM (Radio, Carbondale, IL)
17-1 – WAND (NBC, Decatur, IL)
17-2 – Cozi (Classic television, Decatur, IL)
17-3 – Cozi 2 (simulcast, Decatur, IL)
51-1 – WEIU (PBS and EIU campus television, Charleston, IL)
51-2 – MHZ Worldview (PBS, Charleston, IL)
51-6 – Weather Mix & WEIU Radio – (EIU campus television, Charleston, IL)

Channels shown in green match the list of channels Antenna Direct’s website predicted we’d receive in Charleston. Channels shown in orange were a complete surprise: The Clearstream 4V antenna is picking up television stations from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois without a signal amp. Carbondale is more than 160 miles south of Charleston — that’s amazing!

These are the channels that Antenna Direct’s site predicted we would receive in Charleston, but we did not:

2-1 WTWO (NBC, Terre Haute, IN)
12-1 WILL (PBS and University of Illinois campus television, Urbana, IL)
23-1 WBUI (CW, Decatur, IL)

Aside from not having the CW network, she’s got plenty of PBS channels, and she’s also able to pick up the NBC affiliate from Decatur, so she really doesn’t need two NBCs.  

Her signal is crystal-clear and strong, and after we got one television set up, I put a splitter in the line and ran a second coax to the other bedroom for another television. Now, both televisions are getting 15 channels with no loss of signal, and two people can watch two different shows at once. Everyone’s happy!


walltv

Final antenna thoughts:

Whenever I’m asked to review a product, I strive to present my experiences accurately, and I realize I’m presenting two wildly different experiences with the same antennas in different locations.

Television reception can be a bit of a tricky thing. The Clearstream Eclipse antenna that performed the best at home in Chicagoland couldn’t register a single channel in Charleston. I expected the larger, Clearstream 4V antenna to be a powerhouse at home, but it wasn’t. In Charleston, the Clearstream 4V performed much better than I expected, even without a signal amplifier. 

There are many factors that can affect television reception. Antennas Direct’s installation literature notes that “building material such as brick, metal siding, radiant barrier and stucco” as well as trees and other obstacles can greatly inhibit the signal. If you’re looking for a new television antenna, I believe the best thing to do would be to purchase your antenna at a retailer with a customer-friendly return policy in case the first one you bring home doesn’t quite perform the way you’d like it to.

Also, remember to be patient and move the antenna around multiple times, rescanning between each move, to see if you’re able to pull in even more channels. (It’s helpful to have another person stationed at the TV who can rescan and report any changes in numbers of channels.)

I appreciate the opportunity from Antennas Direct to review both of these antennas. While we didn’t end up with a new antenna installed at home, my daughter is beyond thrilled with her free television reception at school. Cable and satellite television are simply out of her budget (a basic cable + internet package is over $100/month in her area) and free television is the best price!

In the days since I installed the Clearstream 4V, my daughter has called to report that there were heavy storms hitting the area, but her television signal remained strong and clear. (She also shared that she’s become hooked on watching Knight Rider reruns on Cozi, but that’s another story…)


More on Antennas Direct:

Learn more about Antennas Direct’s products at AntennasDirect.com. Antennas Direct products are also available at Amazon, Walmart, Best Buy, Costco, and other retailers. 

Disclosure: Antennas Direct has provided me with two television antennas for this review. I have been compensated for this post. This post contains affiliate links. Read full Disclosure Policy.

Comments

  1. J.R. says

    I can’t find the post I made a month or so ago [I still HATE the “new” site and its lack of features], but Menards recently had an antenna on sale that was more like the one I currently have. I wonder how something like that would compare.

    Those disk antennas really aren’t designed for the areas where we live, and would be better suited for someone in the city.

    • says

      Your post is here & can be found with the search feature: http://jillcataldo.com/rebate-and-coupon-deals-menards-8716-81316/#comment-204028

      It also looks like the one we’ve had for years.

      I think the element antennas tend to be more omnidirectional – particularly with the outdoor antenna, I found that even small directional adjustments to the Clearstream 4V made a difference as to what it can pull in.

      As for the site – it’s been a year and a half since the redesign, and I wouldn’t have been able to continue blogging without a mobile-friendly format. All of the features are still here, albeit in different places. I understand not everyone likes change, but It is what it is. :)

  2. wolverine70 says

    I’m surprised she didn’t pull in WTHI in Charleston from Terre Haute, which would’ve included CW on a subchannel. The smaller antenna may have suffered from extra interference within the apartment building. Mini-satellite dishes possibly? Either way, good for you for packing the other antenna, but the old school antennas seem to do the best. I pull in almost 50 channels in the Detroit area, even a low powered station that often can’t be picked up outside of the city proper with my 30 year old rooftop antenna. Thanks for sharing your experience.

    • says

      I’m surprised too (about Terre Haute — she’s not too far away from there) but again, I think the directional nature of these antennas affects that over an omnidirectional design. Even changing the position of the outdoor antenna, we weren’t able to pull it in — and then we were losing the channels she was getting with the antenna facing more to the north. At some point, you think, “hey, this is the most we’re going to get” and go with that. :)

  3. assassin says

    even with the damage, your old antenna rocks. i’m considerably closer to Chicago than you, and wouldn’t expect to pick up Rockford stations, yet you even pick up a couple Chicago-based stations (41 and 52) that i don’t! the house has a giant conventional antenna that’s unfortunately attic-mounted, and one TV set has the option of a homemade coat-hanger one like from the video couponal linked. the former is generally better, but the latter has its advantages (e.g. better reception of NBC), and it being right near a window helps.

    i dunno whether our big antenna has an amp. also, i’ve read that installing coaxial terminators, which can be had for a few bucks each, on the two unused outlets might get rid of distortion to the signal. (dust caps are cheaper, but won’t accomplish that.)

    it’d be nice to catch Stargate SG-1 on Comet without having to move out to the boonies (or space, for that matter). ;)

    if your current roof antenna falls apart more, might as well replace it with something similar. from what i understand, there’s really no such thing as an “HD antenna”, so these newfangled shapes that compromise size (and reception, apparently) don’t accomplish much of anything.

    finally, is the Clearstream 4V outdoors grounded/bonded? there’s an off-chance that thing could get hit by lightning, and damage the television sets.

    • says

      I agree – our current setup, even with its damaged elements, is really effective.

      The Clearstream 4V I installed at the apartment isn’t grounded — honestly, there wasn’t really anywhere -to- ground it as it’s installed on the side of her building. Hopefully it doesn’t sustain a lightning strike.

      IF it does, it would not be the end of the world — the two sets inside are not exactly top-of-the-line. Our daughter’s is a little 13″ analog tube TV that’s about 15 years old. She’s been using an HD converter box with it to tune in the HD channels since the digital switchover in ’09. The other flatscreen set already has a blown tuner (I don’t know its history, so I can only guess how that happened) and they thought it would only be good for watching DVDs.

      We had an extra HD converter box that I’d brought along as part of my antenna-installation troubleshooting arsenal (I found it new in the box at the Goodwill store for $2.99!) Some brands of converters have better tuners than others, and I wanted to try both out with her tube TV to see which was more effective in her area. Since I had two boxes, we put the other converter box on the flatscreen with the blown tuner, and now both are receiving the antenna channels.

      So… worst case, if the antenna sustains a lightning strike, we’ll lose two converter boxes, one already-half-blown TV and one small, older tube TV. (Hey – it’s college! Does anyone take their BEST gear to college? :)

  4. dolrskolr says

    We’ve had the 4V and the 2V for about 6 years (one on each tv, different rooms). We had the 4V in the attic aiming it out the window. It was sketchy but I was still ok with what we got for zero dollars per month. For myself, I really am mostly interested in Ch. 11, Ch. 20, Ch. 38, and Ch. 50. Seemed like reception got a little more consistent in the winter. But, hubby mounted it on the side of the garage this past month, at the peak,where it rises above the roofline, aimed toward Chicago (had to make a choice). There is tree foliage but, even with that, WHAT A DIFFERENCE! No more scrambled, sketchy reception. I get more than I used to with the interior attic mount and clarify is amazing. However, we have never been able to get Ch. 2. That’s ok. For free, I can live with that. We receive, the following channels: 5-1, 5-2, 7-1, 7-2, 7-3, 9-1, 9-2, 9-3, 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, 11-4, 20-1, 20-2, 20-3, 23-1, 23-2, 23-3, 26-1, 26-2, 26-3, 26-4, 26-5, 32-1, 38-1, 38-2, 38-3, 38-4, 38-5, 38-6, 44-1, 44-2, 48-1, 48-2, 50-1, 50-2, 50-4, 60-1, 60-2, 60-3, 62-1, 62-2, 62-3, 62-4, 66-1, 66-2, 66-3. Pretty good for free I’d say!

    • says

      I’ll say! That’s an excellent channel list for our area. You’re getting GREAT reception with the 4V, and I’m glad to hear that. I really was surprised we weren’t able to pull in more channels with it in where we live, but the fact that the 4V is able to pick up Carbondale stations over a hundred miles from Charleston tells me that under the right conditions, it can be quite effective. At her place, there are far fewer trees in the immediate vicinity of the antenna, and the antenna’s also mounted a lot higher than it was at our house, which helps a lot too.

    • says

      A few reasons: One, she’s a journalism major, and her journalism colleagues host the local news on EIU’s television channel — she wants to be able to watch it. She also wants her major network television programming without having to pay for television service.

      With regard to Netflix, there’s another snag, especially in households with multiple people: The local cable company in Charleston (Mediacom) does not offer unlimited data plans for internet service. They simply don’t — everything is tiered by speed, price, and a monthly data allotment. You have to choose which data cap you can live with, and a higher data cap, of course, comes with a higher price.

      When you think about it, in a college town where the majority of the residents are students, the cable company’s going to make a lot more money this way versus setting up a system where students can stream movies nonstop day and night. We helped her pick a data plan that will be sufficient for her household’s needs, but that plan doesn’t include enough data for Netflixing every night.

      Plus, neither of the TVs in the apartment are smart TVs, so she’d also need a Roku or similar device to get Netflix on the TV anyway :)

  5. David Mccabe says

    I’m surprised at your lack of channels you were able to get with the 4V. We cut the cord about 6 years ago, and after 2 or three sub-par models, purchased that same antenna. The biggest problem with the others was not getting channel 2 from Chicago, and my wife’s favorite shows were the CSI franchises and NCIS, both CBS shows.

    The 4V has worked very well, and we are in the Aurora area, with is in a dip, making reception hit or miss with a lot of antennas.

    • Dave mccabe says

      Oh, and the antenna is in the attic, about 1/2 way to the roof line. I put it there only because the builder had a coax cable up there running from the basement, where a splitter is to go out all of the outlets in the house.

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